SBP: Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling and Prediction

The 2013 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, & Prediction (SBP 2013)

SBP is a multidisciplinary conference with a selective single paper track and poster session. SBP also invites a small number of high quality tutorials and nationally recognized keynote speakers.

Key information

Dates:Pre-conference Tutorials April 2, 2013
Program April 3 - 5, 2013
Location:University of California DC Center, 1608 Rhode Island Ave NW Washington, DC 20036
Pre-registration:
(No refunds issued after April 1, 2013)
Regular $385Students $300
On-site Registration: Regular $405Students $335

Online registration site

Keynote Speakers


  1. Bernardo Huberman
    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories

  2. Michele Gelfand
    University of Maryland

  3. Myron Gutmann
    National Science Foundation

Please feel free to download and redistribute the conference flyer.

Conference Description

The 2013 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction (SBP) is a multidisciplinary conference with a selective single paper track and poster session. SBP also invites a small number of high quality tutorials and nationally recognized keynote speakers.

The SBP conference provides a forum for researchers and practitioners from academia, industry, and government agencies to exchange ideas on current challenges in social computing, behavioral modeling and prediction, and on state-of-the-art methods and best practices being adopted to tackle these challenges. Interactive events at the conference are designed to promote cross-disciplinary contact.

Social Computing harnesses the power of computational methods to study social behavior within a social context. Behavioral Cultural modeling refers to representing behavior and culture in the abstract, and is a convenient and powerful way to conduct virtual experiments and scenario analysis. Both social computing and behavioralcultural modeling are techniques designed to achieve a better understanding of complex behaviors, patterns, and associated outcomes of interest. Moreover, these approaches are inherently interdisciplinary; subsystems and system components exist at multiple levels of analysis (i.e., "cells to societies") and across multiple disciplines, from engineering and the computational sciences to the social and health sciences.

This word cloud is based on talk and poster titles from SBP 2012. (created with Wordle)

Previous SBP Events

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